SALES HOTLINE +49 (0) 89 45228920

 >  >  > Galaxy II Pianos
Galaxy II Pianos
zoom
release date: 09.06.2010

Galaxy II Pianos

4.9 of 5
 (11)
€ 259,-
$ 259.00
£ 219.00
Full Product
AAX native, AU, Mac, RTAS, Standalone, VST, Win
ca. 15.13 GB
Shipping product
in stock
€ 259,-$ 259.00£ 219.00
Download
after successsful payment
€ 259,-$ 259.00£ 219.00
Update*
AAX native, AU, Mac, RTAS, Standalone, VST, Win
Shipping product
in stock
€ 59,-$ 59.00£ 51.00
Galaxy II Logo GALAXY II K4, highly rated Galaxy II Grand Piano Collection
Galaxy II Banner

Galaxy II contains three grand pianos: the Vienna Grand (a powerful Bösendorfer Imperial), the 1929 German Baby Grand (a Vintage Blüthner baby grand), and the 5 star awarded Galaxy Steinway in stereo and 5.1 surround. Galaxy II K4 is based on the Kontakt engine by Native Instruments, presenting new features, better performance and a completely redesigned direct access user interface.

The upcoming  version Galaxy II K4 is based on the  Kontakt engine by Native Instruments, presenting new features, better performance and a completely redesigned direct access user interface. Version 4 offers true half pedaling, true repedaling and dynamically playable pedal, damper and string noises when using a continuous sustain pedal.

Additional resonance release and noise samples have been added and all the 30GB of samples of Galaxy II have been revised and enhanced.

Galaxy Pianos Version 4 takes the Galaxy II Grand Piano Collection to an new level.

Screen Galaxy Vienna Grand

  • Three world class grand pianos
  • Galaxy Steinway 5.1 (Steinway D in 5.1 surround and stereo)
  • Vienna Grand Imperial (96 Key Bösendorfer with incredible low end)
  • 1929 German Baby Grand (Vintage Blüthner with a beautiful singing tone)
  • More than 6,000 samples in 24 bit (30GB/18GB with sample compression)
  • Warp Engine for sound design beyond regular piano sounds
  • Compatible with Kontakt (Player) 4.2 or newer
     

* Update
For registered users of Galaxy II KP2

Vienna Grand

Galxy II BoesendorferGalaxy IIs Vienna Grand is comprised of sampling a BOESENDORFER IMPERIAL 290 grand piano. Established by Ignaz Bösendorfer in 1828, Bösendorfer are the oldest piano manufacturers still in production and have a history of constructing some of the worlds finest instruments. The Model 290 Imperial, a 96” grand piano, is famous for its powerful soundboard and its extended keyboard; going as far as a bottom C0, making a full eight octave range or 97 keys. Sometimes, these extra keys are hidden under a small hinged lid, on others, the colours of the extra white keys are reversed (black instead of white). The extra keys are added primarily for increased resonance from the associated strings; that is, they vibrate sympathetically with other strings whenever the damper pedal is depressed thus creating a fuller tone. With the VIENNA GRAND they are playable.

The Vienna Grand was recorded at Hansahaus Studios/Germany which is famous for its outstanding Jazz Recordings and has received two Grammy Awards. We placed great emphasis on capturing the Bösendorfers huge dynamic range and energy, especially its powerful low end; using additional microphones in the lower register.

  • Vienna Grand Imperial (96 Key Bösendorfer with incredible low end)
  • More than 2,000 samples in 24 bit
  • 13 modeled velocity zones for a wide and smooth dynamic rang
  • Additional resonance, release and noise samples
  • Chromatic and multiple velocity resonance and release samples
  • Multi velocity pedal, damper, hammer and string noises
  • Real una corda samples
  • Real overtones Powered by the Kontakt Player engine
  • Kontakt Player license included
  • New direct access user interface
  • Lossless sample compression for better disk streaming
  • True half pedaling when using a continuous sustain pedal
  • True repedaling and sostenuto
  • Noises dynamically playable with a continuous sustain pedal
  • One-knob control of tone colour and dynamics.
  • Intelligent EQ for warmth, punch and brilliance
  • Sympathetic string resonance with real overtones
  • Flexible and easy-to-use velocity editor
  • Convolution reverb with many different types of rooms, concert halls and ambience
  • Adjustable stereo width and position
  • Specially designed compressor for pop piano sounds
  • Pad Machine
  • Warp Engine for sound design beyond regular piano sounds


Galaxy Steinway

GAlaxy II SteinwayHeinrich Engelhard Steinweg, piano maker of the Steinweg brand, emigrated from Germany to America in 1850. In 1853, Steinweg founded Steinway & Sons, by the year 2000, Steinway had made its 550,000th piano. The Steinway Model D 270 is probably the most popular concert grand of all. For Galaxy II, a Model D was recorded in Galaxy Studios, Belgium; one of the most sophisticated high-end studios in Europe, which also boasts a huge recording hall. The instrument was chosen by studio owner Wilfried van Baaren from a range of dozens of instruments at Steinway/Hamburg. It has been recorded in 5.1 surround and stereo with a tremendous microphone setup to capture its size and dynamic range with 6 channels.

  • Galaxy Steinway 5.1 (Steinway D in 5.1 surround and stereo)
  • More than 2,000 samples in 24 bit
  • 10 modeled velocity zones for a wide and smooth dynamic rang
  • Additional resonance, release and noise samples
  • Chromatic and multiple velocity resonance and release samples
  • Multi velocity pedal, damper, hammer and string noises
  • Real overtones Powered by the Kontakt Player engine
  • Kontakt Player license included
  • New direct access user interface
  • Lossless sample compression for better disk streaming
  • True half pedaling when using a continuous sustain pedal
  • True repedaling and sostenuto
  • Noises dynamically playable with a continuous sustain pedal
  • One-knob control of tone colour and dynamics.
  • Intelligent EQ for warmth, punch and brilliance
  • Sympathetic string resonance with real overtones
  • Flexible and easy-to-use velocity editor
  • Convolution reverb with many different types of rooms, concert halls and ambience
  • Adjustable stereo width and position
  • Specially designed compressor for pop piano sounds
  • Pad Machine
  • Warp Engine for sound design beyond regular piano sounds

1929 German Baby Grand

Galaxy II BluethnerThe Blüthner piano company has been manufacturing the Europes finest pianos in their factory in Leipzig, Germany since 1853. By 1885, the company was the largest European piano manufacturer. Numerous royals, composers, conductors, artists and performers have owned Blüthner pianos. They include Brahms, Bartok, Debussy, Tchaikovsky and Wagner. Blüthners have also been used in popular music. One was used on The Beatles Let It Be album, most notably, in the hits ‘Let It Be and ‘The Long and Winding Road. Galaxy IIs 1929 GERMAN BABY GRAND is based on a BLÜTHNER Model 150, built in 1929. This beautiful 75 year old grand piano features a warm , vintage sound wíth a wonderful intimate tone.

  • 1929 German Baby Grand (Vintage Blüthner with a beautiful singing tone)
  • More than 6,000 samples in 24 bit (30GB/18GB with sample compression)
  • 13 modeled velocity zones for a wide and smooth dynamic rang
  • Additional resonance, release and noise samples
  • Chromatic and multiple velocity resonance and release samples
  • Multi velocity pedal, damper, hammer and string noises
  • Real una corda samples
  • Real overtones Powered by the Kontakt Player engine
  • Kontakt Player license included
  • New direct access user interface
  • Lossless sample compression for better disk streaming
  • True half pedaling when using a continuous sustain pedal
  • True repedaling and sostenuto
  • Noises dynamically playable with a continuous sustain pedal
  • One-knob control of tone colour and dynamics.
  • Intelligent EQ for warmth, punch and brilliance
  • Sympathetic string resonance with real overtones
  • Flexible and easy-to-use velocity editor
  • Convolution reverb with many different types of rooms, concert halls and ambience
  • Adjustable stereo width and position
  • Specially designed compressor for pop piano sounds
  • Pad Machine
  • Warp Engine for sound design beyond regular piano sounds

All pianos of the Galaxy II Pianos Collection (Steinway, Vienna Grand, Baby Grand) are also available as single downloads.

Comments
Computer Music/UK: „Overall, Galaxy II is the best piano ROMpler weve ever had the pleasure of playing.“
Samplecraze: „In terms of value for money, I cannot recommend a better piano vsti than Galaxy 2. For features, sounds, playability and the Warp function Galaxy 2 is on its own.“
Sound on Sound: „Let´s cut to the chase — the piano sounds great.“
Virtual Instruments: „It is an ultra realistic playing experience to sit at each of these sampled gems. All three are absolutely gorgeous sounding.“
Music Players: „While there are numerous sample-based piano software applications out there, few programs offer control over as many fine details within your sound as Galaxy II.“
 

top

related products Related products

To The Top
top

info More infos

To The Top
top

review Reviews

To The Top

Flag ENspaceVirtual Piano Domain 2010


VP Award

Excerpt:

Sound 5 of 5 The overall sound of Galaxy II pianos is very moving and singing. It is obvious that the expensive recording gears shown their value here. Also Galaxy II pianos should thank their great piano tuner. All of 3 pianos are matching their sound style, especially the Steinway. Galaxy II pianos really catch the soul of Steinway sound, brilliant and huge, with a singing and sweet highs. Galaxy II pianos' sound is classical. If you can sit down and spend some time to

 


Flag ENspaceComputer Music 03/2008



Computer Music  Testfazit:
As well as the array of traditional piano patches, some more esoteric global presets are supplied, including thomann lush pads and warped tones. While the former simply layers the pianos up with some fairly generic samples, the effect works really well, and the wide variety of timbres available right off the bat is a great touch. Overall, Galaxy II is the best piano ROMpler weve ever thomann had the pleasure of playing.
 


Flag ENspaceMusic Radar 03/2008



MusicRadar.com  Testfazit:
Overall, Galaxy II is the best piano ROMpler we´ve ever had the pleasure of playing.
 


Flag ENspaceAward in musicplayers.com


WIHO Award

Wish I had one award in musicplayers.com


Flag DEspaceAmazona.de 18.10.2010


Amazona Hervorragend 3 Sterne

Auszug:

Fazit

Das Galaxy II ist aktuell mein absoluter Lieblingsflügel unter den Plug-ins. Wer hätte gedacht, dass ich das mal sagen würde, nach 20 Jahren zähneknirschender Pionierzeit auf diesem Gebiet. Mag sein, dass es in drei Jahren wieder was Besseres gibt. Momentan nicht...für mich! KAUFEN!


Plus
•Qualität
•Vielfältigkeit
•Engine
•Preis
•Das jährliche nervtötende Stimmen und dessen Kosten fallen weg
 

Minus
•Klavierhocker nur separat erhältlich

Amazona Testbericht Galaxy II


Flag DEspaceBonedo 16.7.2010


Bonedo 5 Sterne

Fazit

Die Galaxy Pianos gehören zweifellos zum Feinsten, was der Plugin-Markt im Bereich Grand Pianos zu bieten hat. Die „Galaxy II Grand Piano Collection“ und das „Vintage D“ verwöhnen uns mit insgesamt 4 herrlichen, handverlesenen Instrumenten, die wunderbar aufgenommen und mit technischer Perfektion zu grandiosen Sample-Libraries verarbeitet wurden. Die schöne und clevere neue Bedienoberfläche der Version K4 sucht unter allem, was ich bisher bei Piano-Plugins gesehen habe, ihresgleichen und bietet intuitiven und unmittelbaren Zugriff auf eine fast unglaubliche Fülle an Parametern. Die Lösungen zur Klangmanipulation sind allesamt extrem gelungen, insbesondere, wenn sie, wie der „Colour“-Regler, auf Sample-Basis arbeiten oder, wie der EQ, umsichtig auf den Pianosound zugeschnitten sind. Der eingebaute Faltungshall ist sehr gut und begegnet den hervorragenden Samples auf Augenhöhe. Schließlich hat man auch bezüglich der Dynamikanpassung keine halben Sachen gemacht, sodass die Galaxy Pianos auf allen Tastaturen ihre volle Schönheit entwickeln können. Lediglich die Warp-Sektion will nicht so recht in das sonst so runde Bild passen. Sicherlich bietet sie die eine oder andere interessante Möglichkeit zur Sound-Verschraubung. Insgesamt aber wirkt sie auf mich wie ein Fremdkörper und kann mit dem allerhöchsten Niveau der anderen Bereiche nicht mithalten. Immerhin aber kann man sie ja auch einfach ausschalten. Alles in allem: eine unbedingte Kaufempfehlung!
Bonedo Testbericht Galaxy II


Flag ENspaceMusicTech 10/2007


Galaxy II is the successor to the acclaimed Galaxy Steinway 5.1 grand piano, with the addition of two more instruments - the Vienna Grand Imperial (Bosendorfer Imperial 290, famous for its powerful soundboard and low end) and a 1929 German Baby Grand (Bluthner), which has a warm, vintage character and intimate tone. The Galaxy Steinway itself is the concert hall Model D 270, recorded in both stereo and 5.1 surround. Needless to say, all three pianos
were captured using the very best mics and recording equipment, without the application of EQ or Compression.

Using Native Instruments' latest Kontakt 2 Player, Galaxy II operates as standalone instrument or as a VST, AU, RTAS and DXi plug-in. As with all KP2 instruments, the interface has been specially tailored to suit the task in hand, offering a range of creative sound-shaping tools including two reverbs (one of which is an impulse response), effects and impressive tone controls. An interesting feature is the single-knob tone control, which is not the usual EQ. Instead it uses different samples for different settings, dynamically mapping and balancing the volume differences between the softer and harder samples.

Multi-sampled at several velocity levels and at whole step intervals, all three pianos sound terrific.  Testbericht : Galaxy II  MusicTech Magazine - October 2007 Galaxy II is the successor to the acclaimed Galaxy Steinway 5.1 grand piano, with the addition of two more instruments - the Vienna Grand Imperial (Bosendorfer Imperial 290, famous for its powerful soundboard and low end) and a 1929 German Baby Grand (Bluthner), which has a warm, vintage character and intimate tone. The Galaxy Steinway itself is the concert hall Model D 270, recorded in both stereo and 5.1 surround. Needless to say, all three pianos
were captured using the very best mics and recording equipment, without the application of EQ or Compression.

Using Native Instruments' latest Kontakt 2 Player, Galaxy II operates as standalone instrument or as a VST, AU, RTAS and DXi plug-in. As with all KP2 instruments, the interface has been specially tailored to suit the task in hand, offering a range of creative sound-shaping tools including two reverbs (one of which is an impulse response), effects and impressive tone controls. An interesting feature is the single-knob tone control, which is not the usual EQ. Instead it uses different samples for different settings, dynamically mapping and balancing the volume differences between the softer and harder samples.

Multi-sampled at several velocity levels and at whole step intervals, all three pianos sound terrific. 


Flag DEspacePC&Musik 5/2007


PC&Musik 5/2007

Flag DEspacect Magazin Nov 2007


Konzertklang 

Galaxy II bildet weltbekannte Konzertflügel in Software nach.

Der Nachfolger der Galaxy Steinway 5.1 verwendet den Sample-Player Kontakt 2.2.2.001 von Native Instruments, der als Plug-in (VSTi, Dxi, AU und RTAS) oder stand-alone läuft. Die 29 GByte umfassende Sample-Bibliothek enthält die Flügel Vienna Grand Imperial, 1929 German Baby Grand sowie den namensgebenden Galaxy Steinway (Modell D270) in
Stereo und in 5.1. Die Software kann 30 Tage im Demomodus betrieben werden, danach muss man sie registrieren.

Die über 6000 Samples mit 24 Bit Auflösung decken selbst die durch das Betätigen der Haltepedale auftretenden Resonanzen ab; zwölf Anschlagstärken sorgen für weiche Übergänge. In der Noise-Sektion regelt man das Geräusch der Pedale und der Hämmer, auch Ausklangphase und Saitengeräusche lassen sich beeinflussen. Einzig die Simulation des Einflusses der umgebenden Geräusche auf die Saiten fehlt.

Resonanzparameter, Klangfarbe, Wärme und Durchsetzungskraft, Lautheit, Deckel, Pedale und einen Kompressor kann der Anwender im Tone-Menü individuell anpassen. Unter „Anatomy“ stellt man Stereobreite, Hörerposition, Tonhöhen, Stimmungen, Transponierung, Feinstimmung, Saitenresonanz, Dynamik und Anschlagstärke/Dynamik ein. Die Charakteristik des Hallraumes lässt sich unter „Space“ anpassen.

Vornehmlich für Klangverfremdungen sorgen die Optionen des Warp-Menüs, etwa die Pad-Machine (einfacher Sampleplayer für Streicherklänge), der Degrader (Verzerrer/Zerstörer) oder der Spiritualizer (sphärisches metallisches „anflangen“), der Alterizer (CPU-intensive Impulse-Response-Technik) und der Time Traveller (Delay).

Mit Galaxy II liefert Best Service eine nahezu perfekte Simulation der klassischen Konzertflügel ab, die einen sehr natürlichen Klangeindruck vermittelt.

(Arne Mertins/vza)

KEYS / Germany

Die Klangqualitaet der Sounds ist ausgezeichnet.
Ein wesentliches Unterscheidungsmerkmal zu anderen Piano-Plugins ist die Möglichkeit, schon im PlugiIn selbst ausgeprägtes Sounddesign zu betreiben.

+ Klangqualitaet
+ Detaillreichtum
+ Bearbeitungsmöglichkeiten

Testbericht : Galaxy II  CT Magazin, November 2007 Konzertklang 

Galaxy II bildet weltbekannte Konzertflügel in Software nach.

Der Nachfolger der Galaxy Steinway 5.1 verwendet den Sample-Player Kontakt 2.2.2.001 von Native Instruments, der als Plug-in (VSTi, Dxi, AU und RTAS) oder stand-alone läuft. Die 29 GByte umfassende Sample-Bibliothek enthält die Flügel Vienna Grand Imperial, 1929 German Baby Grand sowie den namensgebenden Galaxy Steinway (Modell D270) in
Stereo und in 5.1. Die Software kann 30 Tage im Demomodus betrieben werden, danach muss man sie registrieren.

Die über 6000 Samples mit 24 Bit Auflösung decken selbst die durch das Betätigen der Haltepedale auftretenden Resonanzen ab; zwölf Anschlagstärken sorgen für weiche Übergänge. In der Noise-Sektion regelt man das Geräusch der Pedale und der Hämmer, auch Ausklangphase und Saitengeräusche lassen sich beeinflussen. Einzig die Simulation des Einflusses der umgebenden Geräusche auf die Saiten fehlt.

Resonanzparameter, Klangfarbe, Wärme und Durchsetzungskraft, Lautheit, Deckel, Pedale und einen Kompressor kann der Anwender im Tone-Menü individuell anpassen. Unter „Anatomy“ stellt man Stereobreite, Hörerposition, Tonhöhen, Stimmungen, Transponierung, Feinstimmung, Saitenresonanz, Dynamik und Anschlagstärke/Dynamik ein. Die Charakteristik des Hallraumes lässt sich unter „Space“ anpassen.

Vornehmlich für Klangverfremdungen sorgen die Optionen des Warp-Menüs, etwa die Pad-Machine (einfacher Sampleplayer für Streicherklänge), der Degrader (Verzerrer/Zerstörer) oder der Spiritualizer (sphärisches metallisches „anflangen“), der Alterizer (CPU-intensive Impulse-Response-Technik) und der Time Traveller (Delay).

Mit Galaxy II liefert Best Service eine nahezu perfekte Simulation der klassischen Konzertflügel ab, die einen sehr natürlichen Klangeindruck vermittelt.

(Arne Mertins/vza)

KEYS / Germany

Die Klangqualitaet der Sounds ist ausgezeichnet.
Ein wesentliches Unterscheidungsmerkmal zu anderen Piano-Plugins ist die Möglichkeit, schon im PlugiIn selbst ausgeprägtes Sounddesign zu betreiben.

+ Klangqualitaet
+ Detaillreichtum
+ Bearbeitungsmöglichkeiten


Flag ENspaceVirtual Instruments Magazine 3/2008


This long awaited successor to the 2004 release of Galaxy Steinway 5.1 adds two more world class pianos:

the Bösendorfer 290 Imperial and a superrare Blüthner Model 150 to the original Steinway Model D 270. But what makes Galaxy II so great is its unprecedented level of realistic playing control and creative sound design.

....

The main menu displays a condensed view of more commonly used parameters pulled from the five sub-menus. There are some pleasant surprises behind these tabs. The Tone menu, for example, appears to have familiar controls: color, resonance, warmth, loudness, etc. Based on other products weve seen, one would expect these to be variants of simple EQs and filters. Instead, the Color knob actually maps between softer and harder samples, the benefit being that you lose none of the dynamics you would to EQ, and the volume remains constant between soft and hard settings. Similarly, the Reso control lets you blend in samples of sympathetic string resonance that have been captured with the damper pedal down, but separately from the dry tone. In this way you can alter the pianos liveliness quite convincingly. Very cool. I also appreciate the Low Keys parameter, allowing you to scale back or emphasize a pianos raw bass intensity around certain musical arrangements. You can even select from playing sample sets captured with the piano lid closed, half-closed, or fully open. And, of all things, a compressor control is located under the tone menu. Galaxys reasoning is that piano compression is as much about changing the sounds shape as it is controlling dynamics. Without the typical ratio, attack, release, or threshold parameters to worry about, this arbitrarily marked control requires some experimentation with others such as color and punch, but is a very nice inclusion. 

...

But the Warp section is perhaps the biggest surprise of all, for a piano library. Here you have access to five FX Machines that you can activate separately (stacking in pre- defined series) and edit through preset/contextual pop-up menus. ...

Producer Uli Baronowsky has done a marvelous job of keeping Galaxy II stream- lined and fast to use. For one, there are no confusing channel multis to wrap your head around in mid-session; the way interface is designed, you have access to all the sounds and controls via top-level instrument presets. 

...

The Vienna Grand Imperial samples are powerful, dark, and full-bodied, thanks to the 290s robust soundboard and extended keyboard. Just as on the original, whenever the damper pedal is depressed, the rest of the notes along the keyboard take on a fuller, more resonant tone resulting from the extended octave vibrating sympathetically. Though the lower octave was often hidden under a small hinged lid on the original, with Vienna Grand they are playable— although mostly for effect, as they lack a musically pleasant pitch. I found the dynamic range and velocity transitions to sound extremely natural with all three pianos, but the additional microphones used to capture the lower register of the 290 add a lot of energy that if youre using a good sub-frequency monitoring set-up. The mid and top registers, though well defined, arent as bright as, say, Synthogys Ivory Grand. While that suits my taste, if brightness is what you want, a twist of the Color knob will give it to you.

The 1929 German Baby Grand offers a distinctly cozier, more vintage sound with an intimate, singing tone. This is due to Blüthners addition of a fourth, sympathetic aliquot string to each trichord group in the reble, richening the pianos overtone spec- trum considerably. Early Blüthner pianos were favored by Brahms, Bartok, Debussy, Tchaikovsky, and Wagner. Even The Beatles used a later model on “Let It Be” and “The Long and Winding Road.”

The Styles presets reflect this versatility quite well: from “Baby Grand Compressed Pop” featuring a hard attack and bright color setting that really cuts through modern production while remaining romantic; and “Baby Grand Vintage Pop,” which uses gentle limiting rather than compression, making use of half-closed lid samples for a rounder sound and slightly reduced stereo width; to the glorious recital sound of “Baby Grand In A Hall,” which uses a chamber music hall impulse response and a soundfield configured to the audiences perspective.

By far the purest sounding tone comes from the stereo-compatible Galaxy Steinway 5.1. Recorded in a 3,440-square- foot hall with 26-foot ceilings at Galaxy Studios in Belgium, the Model D 270 was sampled direct to Pro Tools HD through a Neve Capricorn console. Five vintage Brüel & Kjær mics were used close-up, and Neumann room mics captured the ambience of the hall. The end product is a magnificent virtual piano that dazzles in any musical style, but is particularly well suited to pop, jazz, and highly compressed contemporary/urban music.

It is an ultra realistic playing experience to sit at each of these sampled gems. All three are absolutely gorgeous sounding, with not a single bum sample to be found. The global presets walk you through dozens of conventional piano styles, layered synth pad pianos, and “warped” pianos that exercise the imagination. As much about creative sound design as absolute authenticity, Galaxy II Grand Piano Collection is a must-have for anyone looking to fill a niche or to top their current arsenal.

by Jason Scott Alexander

www.virtualinstrumentsmag.com

Review: Galaxy II Grand Piano Collection   Virtual Instruments Magazine / USA March 2008 This long awaited successor to the 2004 release of Galaxy Steinway 5.1 adds two more world class pianos: the Bösendorfer 290 Imperial and a superrare Blüthner Model 150 to the original Steinway Model D 270. But what makes Galaxy II so great is its unprecedented level of realistic playing control and creative sound design. .... The main menu displays a condensed view of more commonly used parameters pulled from the five sub-menus. There are some pleasant surprises behind these tabs. The Tone menu, for example, appears to have familiar controls: color, resonance, warmth, loudness, etc. Based on other products weve seen, one would expect these to be variants of simple EQs and filters. Instead, the Color knob actually maps between softer and harder samples, the benefit being that you lose none of the dynamics you would to EQ, and the volume remains constant between soft and hard settings. Similarly, the Reso control lets you blend in samples of sympathetic string resonance that have been captured with the damper pedal down, but separately from the dry tone. In this way you can alter the pianos liveliness quite convincingly. Very cool. I also appreciate the Low Keys parameter, allowing you to scale back or emphasize a pianos raw bass intensity around certain musical arrangements. You can even select from playing sample sets captured with the piano lid closed, half-closed, or fully open. And, of all things, a compressor control is located under the tone menu. Galaxys reasoning is that piano compression is as much about changing the sounds shape as it is controlling dynamics. Without the typical ratio, attack, release, or threshold parameters to worry about, this arbitrarily marked control requires some experimentation with others such as color and punch, but is a very nice inclusion.  ... But the Warp section is perhaps the biggest surprise of all, for a piano library. Here you have access to five FX Machines that you can activate separately (stacking in pre- defined series) and edit through preset/contextual pop-up menus. ... Producer Uli Baronowsky has done a marvelous job of keeping Galaxy II stream- lined and fast to use. For one, there are no confusing channel multis to wrap your head around in mid-session; the way interface is designed, you have access to all the sounds and controls via top-level instrument presets.  ... The Vienna Grand Imperial samples are powerful, dark, and full-bodied, thanks to the 290s robust soundboard and extended keyboard. Just as on the original, whenever the damper pedal is depressed, the rest of the notes along the keyboard take on a fuller, more resonant tone resulting from the extended octave vibrating sympathetically. Though the lower octave was often hidden under a small hinged lid on the original, with Vienna Grand they are playable— although mostly for effect, as they lack a musically pleasant pitch. I found the dynamic range and velocity transitions to sound extremely natural with all three pianos, but the additional microphones used to capture the lower register of the 290 add a lot of energy that if youre using a good sub-frequency monitoring set-up. The mid and top registers, though well defined, arent as bright as, say, Synthogys Ivory Grand. While that suits my taste, if brightness is what you want, a twist of the Color knob will give it to you. The 1929 German Baby Grand offers a distinctly cozier, more vintage sound with an intimate, singing tone. This is due to Blüthners addition of a fourth, sympathetic aliquot string to each trichord group in the reble, richening the pianos overtone spec- trum considerably. Early Blüthner pianos were favored by Brahms, Bartok, Debussy, Tchaikovsky, and Wagner. Even The Beatles used a later model on “Let It Be” and “The Long and Winding Road.” The Styles presets reflect this versatility quite well: from “Baby Grand Compressed Pop” featuring a hard attack and bright color setting that really cuts through modern production while remaining romantic; and “Baby Grand Vintage Pop,” which uses gentle limiting rather than compression, making use of half-closed lid samples for a rounder sound and slightly reduced stereo width; to the glorious recital sound of “Baby Grand In A Hall,” which uses a chamber music hall impulse response and a soundfield configured to the audiences perspective. By far the purest sounding tone comes from the stereo-compatible Galaxy Steinway 5.1. Recorded in a 3,440-square- foot hall with 26-foot ceilings at Galaxy Studios in Belgium, the Model D 270 was sampled direct to Pro Tools HD through a Neve Capricorn console. Five vintage Brüel & Kjær mics were used close-up, and Neumann room mics captured the ambience of the hall. The end product is a magnificent virtual piano that dazzles in any musical style, but is particularly well suited to pop, jazz, and highly compressed contemporary/urban music. It is an ultra realistic playing experience to sit at each of these sampled gems. All three are absolutely gorgeous sounding, with not a single bum sample to be found. The global presets walk you through dozens of conventional piano styles, layered synth pad pianos, and “warped” pianos that exercise the imagination. As much about creative sound design as absolute authenticity, Galaxy II Grand Piano Collection is a must-have for anyone looking to fill a niche or to top their current arsenal. by Jason Scott Alexander www.virtualinstrumentsmag.com     

Flag DEspaceXSound 2/2008


„Piano-Riese“


Mit der Galaxy II Grand Piano Collection ist jetzt der lange erwartete Nachfolger der hoch gelobten Galaxy Steinway 5.1 Ausgabe erschienen. Die neue Version hält jetzt drei verschiedene Flügelmodelle mit unterschiedlichen Charakteren bereit und erlaubt zusätzlich einige interessante Möglichkeiten zu kreativem Sound-Design. Das Plug-In nutzt als Plattform den Kontakt Player 2 von Native Instruments und ein speziell designtes User-Interface, das einen einfachen und flexiblen Umgang mit den zahlreichen, neu
hinzugekommenen Parametern ermöglichen soll. Der Vertrieb des Instruments liegt in den (bewährten) Händen von Best Service in München, meiner bevorzugten Adresse für Sounds und Samples seit den Zeiten eines Akai S1000 und seinen heute noch immer aktuellen Libraries. Grundsätzlich sind die Klavier-Libraries immer die Königsdisziplin im Bereich von Sampling und Plug-In- Instrumenten, gilt es hier doch den Spagat zwischen hoher klanglicher Authentizität und einer vertretbaren Rechnerbelastung zu schaffen, die ein realistisches Spielgefühl erst möglich machen. Hier müssen sich die Plug-Ins im Vergleich zu den Hardware- Digitalpianos stellen, bei denen die Entwicklung auch nicht stehen geblieben ist.


Die Features des Galaxy II

Die Sammlung stellt jetzt drei verschiedene Flügelmodelle bereit.

Neben dem bekannten Steinway D, der sowohl in Stereo als auch in 5.1 Surround aufgezeichnet ist, sind dies ein Bösendorfer Vienna Grand Imperial 290 mit 97 Tasten und ein Blüthner Stutzflügel aus dem Jahr 1929, also drei Modelle mit ganz unterschiedlichen Klangeigenschaften.

Diese drei Instrumente wurden mit über 6000 Samples in 24Bit und Top-Equipment in den Galaxy Studios in Belgien und im Hansahaus Studio in Bonn eingefangen, also ersten Adressen der Branche. Für einen großen Dynamikbereich sind die Instrumente in bis zu 13 editierbaren Velocity-Zonen spielbar, sodass sie an nahezu jede
Spielsituation anzupassen sind. Unterschiedliche Samples für eine einstellbare Saitenresonanz mit und ohne Pedal, echte Una Corda Samples (Soft Pedal) und eine Geräuschbibliothek für Hammer, Pedal, Dämpfer und Saitengeräusche sorgen für einen großen Detailreichtum. Die Sympathetic String Resonance (SSR) sorgt für echte Obertöne mit erweiterten Intervall-Funktionen (Oktave, Sexte, Quinte, Quarte und Terz), die stufenlos einstellbar sind. Über den Kontakt 2 Player und das User Interface sind die meisten Parameter in 11 Menus übersichtlich angeordnet und lassen sich meist mit einer 1-Knopf-Kontrolle regeln. Ein sehr guter Faltungshall – unter anderem mit 96 Räumen von der Best Service DVD „Halls of Fame“ - stellt die Instrumente in die passenden Räume, ein speziell programmierter Kompressor sorgt für typische Pop-Piano-Sounds. Eine gute Auswahl an Flächenklängen ermöglicht flexible Layer-Sounds, während man mit der Warp-Funktion gänzlich abgefahrene Sounds kreieren kann.

Fazit

Der Klang des Galaxy ist außergewöhnlich gut, und das liegt an der geschickten Auswahl dreier unterschiedlicher Spitzeninstrumente, gepaart mit einer erstklassigen Sampling-Qualität unter Berücksichtigung aller Klangaspekte eines solch komplexen Instruments, wie das Klavier nun mal eines ist. Auch Klangpuristen sollten hier zufrieden sein, die Grenze des Machbaren wird nur durch die Leistung des Rechners definiert.


Best Service Galaxy II

Grand Piano Collection

- 3 Flügel-Modelle:

- Galaxy Steinway 5.1 (Surround und Stereo), Vienna Grand Imperial, 1929 German Baby Grand

- über 6000 Samples (Steinway D, Bösendorfer 290, 1929 Blüthner Baby Grand)

- 48 kHz Version in 24 Bit

- bis zu 13 Velocity Zones

- echte Sustain Resonance und Release Samples in mehreren Velocitystufen und Längen

- echte Una Corda Samples (Soft Pedal)

- Hammer-, Pedal- und Dämpfergeräusche separat zuschalt- und regelbar

- einfacher Zugriff auf Tone Colour (ohne EQ), Warmth und Dynamics

- Warp-Section mit 4 FX Maschinen für drastische Soundbearbeitungen

- Pad-Machine zur Generierung sphärischer Synth-Flächen

- integrierter Faltungs-Hall

- Stereobreite und -position regelbar

- Intel-Mac fähig

- unterstützte Plug-In Schnittstellen: VST, AU, RTAS, DXi, Standalone


Testbericht : Galaxy II  XSound Februar 2008 „Piano-Riese“


Mit der Galaxy II Grand Piano Collection ist jetzt der lange erwartete Nachfolger der hoch gelobten Galaxy Steinway 5.1 Ausgabe erschienen. Die neue Version hält jetzt drei verschiedene Flügelmodelle mit unterschiedlichen Charakteren bereit und erlaubt zusätzlich einige interessante Möglichkeiten zu kreativem Sound-Design. Das Plug-In nutzt als Plattform den Kontakt Player 2 von Native Instruments und ein speziell designtes User-Interface, das einen einfachen und flexiblen Umgang mit den zahlreichen, neu
hinzugekommenen Parametern ermöglichen soll. Der Vertrieb des Instruments liegt in den (bewährten) Händen von Best Service in München, meiner bevorzugten Adresse für Sounds und Samples seit den Zeiten eines Akai S1000 und seinen heute noch immer aktuellen Libraries. Grundsätzlich sind die Klavier-Libraries immer die Königsdisziplin im Bereich von Sampling und Plug-In- Instrumenten, gilt es hier doch den Spagat zwischen hoher klanglicher Authentizität und einer vertretbaren Rechnerbelastung zu schaffen, die ein realistisches Spielgefühl erst möglich machen. Hier müssen sich die Plug-Ins im Vergleich zu den Hardware- Digitalpianos stellen, bei denen die Entwicklung auch nicht stehen geblieben ist.


Die Features des Galaxy II

Die Sammlung stellt jetzt drei verschiedene Flügelmodelle bereit.

Neben dem bekannten Steinway D, der sowohl in Stereo als auch in 5.1 Surround aufgezeichnet ist, sind dies ein Bösendorfer Vienna Grand Imperial 290 mit 97 Tasten und ein Blüthner Stutzflügel aus dem Jahr 1929, also drei Modelle mit ganz unterschiedlichen Klangeigenschaften.

Diese drei Instrumente wurden mit über 6000 Samples in 24Bit und Top-Equipment in den Galaxy Studios in Belgien und im Hansahaus Studio in Bonn eingefangen, also ersten Adressen der Branche. Für einen großen Dynamikbereich sind die Instrumente in bis zu 13 editierbaren Velocity-Zonen spielbar, sodass sie an nahezu jede
Spielsituation anzupassen sind. Unterschiedliche Samples für eine einstellbare Saitenresonanz mit und ohne Pedal, echte Una Corda Samples (Soft Pedal) und eine Geräuschbibliothek für Hammer, Pedal, Dämpfer und Saitengeräusche sorgen für einen großen Detailreichtum. Die Sympathetic String Resonance (SSR) sorgt für echte Obertöne mit erweiterten Intervall-Funktionen (Oktave, Sexte, Quinte, Quarte und Terz), die stufenlos einstellbar sind. Über den Kontakt 2 Player und das User Interface sind die meisten Parameter in 11 Menus übersichtlich angeordnet und lassen sich meist mit einer 1-Knopf-Kontrolle regeln. Ein sehr guter Faltungshall – unter anderem mit 96 Räumen von der Best Service DVD „Halls of Fame“ - stellt die Instrumente in die passenden Räume, ein speziell programmierter Kompressor sorgt für typische Pop-Piano-Sounds. Eine gute Auswahl an Flächenklängen ermöglicht flexible Layer-Sounds, während man mit der Warp-Funktion gänzlich abgefahrene Sounds kreieren kann.

Fazit

Der Klang des Galaxy ist außergewöhnlich gut, und das liegt an der geschickten Auswahl dreier unterschiedlicher Spitzeninstrumente, gepaart mit einer erstklassigen Sampling-Qualität unter Berücksichtigung aller Klangaspekte eines solch komplexen Instruments, wie das Klavier nun mal eines ist. Auch Klangpuristen sollten hier zufrieden sein, die Grenze des Machbaren wird nur durch die Leistung des Rechners definiert.


Best Service Galaxy II

Grand Piano Collection

- 3 Flügel-Modelle:

- Galaxy Steinway 5.1 (Surround und Stereo), Vienna Grand Imperial, 1929 German Baby Grand

- über 6000 Samples (Steinway D, Bösendorfer 290, 1929 Blüthner Baby Grand)

- 48 kHz Version in 24 Bit

- bis zu 13 Velocity Zones

- echte Sustain Resonance und Release Samples in mehreren Velocitystufen und Längen

- echte Una Corda Samples (Soft Pedal)

- Hammer-, Pedal- und Dämpfergeräusche separat zuschalt- und regelbar

- einfacher Zugriff auf Tone Colour (ohne EQ), Warmth und Dynamics

- Warp-Section mit 4 FX Maschinen für drastische Soundbearbeitungen

- Pad-Machine zur Generierung sphärischer Synth-Flächen

- integrierter Faltungs-Hall

- Stereobreite und -position regelbar

- Intel-Mac fähig

- unterstützte Plug-In Schnittstellen: VST, AU, RTAS, DXi, Standalone



Flag DEspaceMusicianslife 2/2008


Ratter ratter - fertig geladen. Finger locker machen, knacks knacks - und jetzt Augen zu. Aaaah! Oooh! Fein akzentuiertes Spiel und derbe Cluster, himmlische Sphären und höllische Saitenmonster. Die Nackenhärchen stellen sich auf. Ein warmes Gefühl breitet sich in mir aus. DAS ist ein Flügel.

Oh je. Wird das jetzt eine emotionale Geschichte? Ich befürchte es. Das Spielen macht einfach unglaublich Spaß, und das mit der alten Fatar-Hammermechanik! Bloß ein bisschen grob, der Anschlag. Also rasch die Velocity-Interpretation angepasst - kein großer Akt im Kontakt-Player. Außerdem brauche ich noch ein wenig mehr Hammergeräusch, auch das lässt sich stufenlos zuregeln. Jetzt noch etwas vom typischen weichen Pedal-Klacken hinzugeben und die Saitenresonanzen ein bisschen hervorgehoben. Nun sitze ich wirklich vor einem Konzertflügel - wenn die Augen geschlossen sind.

Das Spielen ist eine Sache. Das Gespielte anhören eine andere! Deshalb entschließe ich mich, meinem soeben aufgenommenen Machwerk aus anderer Perspektive zu lauschen. Dies lässt sich mit einem einfachen Klick auf den “Listening Position”-Knopf in der Abteilung “Anatomy” bewerkstelligen. Dann erklingt das Instrument nämlich nicht mehr so, wie es der Pianist wahrnimmt, sondern das Publikum. Aber eigentlich sollte das Publikum den Flügel in einem Konzertsaal doch von der Seite hören und nicht einfach die Kanäle getauscht werden. Doch man kann im Leben nicht alles haben. Dafür lässt sich aber mit dem integrierten Kontakt-Faltungshall der Saal auf die gewünschte Größe und Beschaffenheit bringen. So soll es sein!

Die passenden Parametersets für den erstrebten Klang sind alle zur Hand, alle mit eindeutiger Beschriftung in gut gewählten Rubriken. Und für die schnelle Anpassung gibt es für mehrere Ebenen diverse Presets. Selbstverständlich kann das Instrument in verschiedenen Stimmungen erklingen, temperiert oder in zahlreichen historischen Stimmungsvarianten.

Im “Tone”-Bereich kann dann noch ein wenig gefiltert, “ikjuut” und komprimiert werden. Das dachte ich zumindest, bis ich am Parameter “Colour” drehte, denn da wurde ich eher einer Art Soundmorphen als einer Filterung gewahr. Und tatsächlich geschieht diese Klangänderung laut Handbuch bereits auf Sampleebene - wieder einmal bin ich erstaunt über die Komplexität dieses Sample-Sets. Denn es gibt keine auffallenden Sprünge zwischen irgendwelchen Samples - weder bezüglich Dynamik noch Tonhöhe oder Ausdruck - saubere Arbeit.

Sogar der Klavierdeckel lässt sich in drei Stufen arretieren. Das aber vermutlich nicht auf Sampleebene, sonst müssten statt vier DVDs wohl zwölf geliefert werden.

Fazit

Galaxy II ist ein virtuelles Instrument, das in erster Linie das Thema “Klassischer Konzertflügel” brillant beherrscht und darüber hinaus auch spaciges Abheben ermöglicht - ohne die Oberfläche verlassen und auf die Host-Möglichkeiten zurückgreifen zu müssen. Für die Sounddesign-Spielereien wurden keine “ernsthaften” Parameter geopfert, alles ist da, wo es sein sollte. Wir sind der Meinung: Das ist spitze.

Alle drei Flügel klingen für sich genommen wunderbar, mit den angebotenen Impulse-Response-Räumen und sehr genau einstellbaren Klanganteilen von z. B. Dämpfer- oder Pedalgeräuschen hat man schon beinahe das Gefühl, selbst zu mikrofonieren - und das mit erlesenstem Equipment. Virtuelles Instrument? Eher schon virtuelle Recordingsession! Mir persönlich hat es vor allem der Blüthner-Flügel mit seinem charmanten weichen Klang angetan. Der passt nämlich noch am ehesten in meine bescheidenen Räumlichkeiten. Für die anderen beiden Modelle wünsche ich mir für das nächste Upgrade bitte ein dreidimensionales Interface für die Augen, damit ich mich noch besser in die Konzertsäle dieser Welt beamen kann.

Redaktionstip

Testbericht : Galaxy II  Musicianslife 02/2008
Ratter ratter - fertig geladen. Finger locker machen, knacks knacks - und jetzt Augen zu. Aaaah! Oooh! Fein akzentuiertes Spiel und derbe Cluster, himmlische Sphären und höllische Saitenmonster. Die Nackenhärchen stellen sich auf. Ein warmes Gefühl breitet sich in mir aus. DAS ist ein Flügel. Oh je. Wird das jetzt eine emotionale Geschichte? Ich befürchte es. Das Spielen macht einfach unglaublich Spaß, und das mit der alten Fatar-Hammermechanik! Bloß ein bisschen grob, der Anschlag. Also rasch die Velocity-Interpretation angepasst - kein großer Akt im Kontakt-Player. Außerdem brauche ich noch ein wenig mehr Hammergeräusch, auch das lässt sich stufenlos zuregeln. Jetzt noch etwas vom typischen weichen Pedal-Klacken hinzugeben und die Saitenresonanzen ein bisschen hervorgehoben. Nun sitze ich wirklich vor einem Konzertflügel - wenn die Augen geschlossen sind. Das Spielen ist eine Sache. Das Gespielte anhören eine andere! Deshalb entschließe ich mich, meinem soeben aufgenommenen Machwerk aus anderer Perspektive zu lauschen. Dies lässt sich mit einem einfachen Klick auf den “Listening Position”-Knopf in der Abteilung “Anatomy” bewerkstelligen. Dann erklingt das Instrument nämlich nicht mehr so, wie es der Pianist wahrnimmt, sondern das Publikum. Aber eigentlich sollte das Publikum den Flügel in einem Konzertsaal doch von der Seite hören und nicht einfach die Kanäle getauscht werden. Doch man kann im Leben nicht alles haben. Dafür lässt sich aber mit dem integrierten Kontakt-Faltungshall der Saal auf die gewünschte Größe und Beschaffenheit bringen. So soll es sein! Die passenden Parametersets für den erstrebten Klang sind alle zur Hand, alle mit eindeutiger Beschriftung in gut gewählten Rubriken. Und für die schnelle Anpassung gibt es für mehrere Ebenen diverse Presets. Selbstverständlich kann das Instrument in verschiedenen Stimmungen erklingen, temperiert oder in zahlreichen historischen Stimmungsvarianten. Im “Tone”-Bereich kann dann noch ein wenig gefiltert, “ikjuut” und komprimiert werden. Das dachte ich zumindest, bis ich am Parameter “Colour” drehte, denn da wurde ich eher einer Art Soundmorphen als einer Filterung gewahr. Und tatsächlich geschieht diese Klangänderung laut Handbuch bereits auf Sampleebene - wieder einmal bin ich erstaunt über die Komplexität dieses Sample-Sets. Denn es gibt keine auffallenden Sprünge zwischen irgendwelchen Samples - weder bezüglich Dynamik noch Tonhöhe oder Ausdruck - saubere Arbeit. Sogar der Klavierdeckel lässt sich in drei Stufen arretieren. Das aber vermutlich nicht auf Sampleebene, sonst müssten statt vier DVDs wohl zwölf geliefert werden. Fazit Galaxy II ist ein virtuelles Instrument, das in erster Linie das Thema “Klassischer Konzertflügel” brillant beherrscht und darüber hinaus auch spaciges Abheben ermöglicht - ohne die Oberfläche verlassen und auf die Host-Möglichkeiten zurückgreifen zu müssen. Für die Sounddesign-Spielereien wurden keine “ernsthaften” Parameter geopfert, alles ist da, wo es sein sollte. Wir sind der Meinung: Das ist spitze. Alle drei Flügel klingen für sich genommen wunderbar, mit den angebotenen Impulse-Response-Räumen und sehr genau einstellbaren Klanganteilen von z. B. Dämpfer- oder Pedalgeräuschen hat man schon beinahe das Gefühl, selbst zu mikrofonieren - und das mit erlesenstem Equipment. Virtuelles Instrument? Eher schon virtuelle Recordingsession! Mir persönlich hat es vor allem der Blüthner-Flügel mit seinem charmanten weichen Klang angetan. Der passt nämlich noch am ehesten in meine bescheidenen Räumlichkeiten. Für die anderen beiden Modelle wünsche ich mir für das nächste Upgrade bitte ein dreidimensionales Interface für die Augen, damit ich mich noch besser in die Konzertsäle dieser Welt beamen kann. Redaktionstip

Flag DEspaceBEAT 2/2008


Eine authentische native Emulation eines klassischen Konzertflügels war noch vor wenigen Jahren undenkbar: Zu groß erschienen die Anforderungen an Arbeitsspeicher und Festplattenplatz. Dies hat sich allerdings inzwischen geändert: Die nicht weniger als 29 GB umfassende Sample-Bibliothek Galaxy II des Münchener Anbieters Best Service vereint gleich drei Weltklasse-Flügel in einem Plug-in. Dabei ist der „Galaxy Steinway“ gleich in einer Stereo- und einer Surround-Version enthalten. Nicht minder aufwändig gesampelt wurden der Vienna-Grand-Imperial- sowie der 1929-German-Baby-Grand-Konzertflügel. Als Bedienoberfl äche kommt der bewährte Kontakt-2-Player von Native Instruments zum Einsatz. Über verschiedene Bildschirmseiten lässt sich auf zahlreiche Parameter Einfl uss nehmen: Auf der Main-Seite finden sich dabei die wichtigsten Parameter, während auf der Tone-Seite der Grundklang editiert werden kann. Neben der Klangfarbe ist hier auch die Lautstärke der Resonanz-Samples regelbar, des Weiteren gibt es einen einfachen, aber effektiven Kompressor. Die Konfiguration der Stimmung und Spielbarkeit kann hingegen auf der Anatomy-Seite vorgenommen werden, die Noise-Seite erlaubt hingegen das Festlegen des Anteils der Hammer-, Dämpfer-, Pedal- und Saitengeräusche.  In Galaxy II stehen zwei Halleffekte zur Auswahl: der Ressourcen sparende Eco Reverb und ein gut klingender Faltungshall.

Fazit

Dank des authentischen, äußerst detaillierten Klangs von Galaxy II und den umfangreichen Klangformungs- und - manipulationsmöglichkeiten konnte das virtuelle Instrument beim Test auf ganzer Linie überzeugen. Dank der umfangreichen Effektsektion gehen die klanglichen Möglichkeiten weit darüber hinaus, was man von einem virtuellen Piano erwartet. So kann man mit dem Plug-in auch Pad-Klänge erzeugen sowie die Samples durch Bit- und Sampleratenreduktion, Chorus-, Flanger- und Phaser-artige Effekte sowie den Impulseffekt Alterizer gehörig durch die Mangel drehen. Nicht unerwähnt bleiben sollen die zahlreichen, musikalisch einsetzbaren globalen Presets. 
Testbericht : Galaxy II  Beat  02/2008

Eine authentische native Emulation eines klassischen Konzertflügels war noch vor wenigen Jahren undenkbar: Zu groß erschienen die Anforderungen an Arbeitsspeicher und Festplattenplatz. Dies hat sich allerdings inzwischen geändert: Die nicht weniger als 29 GB umfassende Sample-Bibliothek Galaxy II des Münchener Anbieters Best Service vereint gleich drei Weltklasse-Flügel in einem Plug-in. Dabei ist der „Galaxy Steinway“ gleich in einer Stereo- und einer Surround-Version enthalten. Nicht minder aufwändig gesampelt wurden der Vienna-Grand-Imperial- sowie der 1929-German-Baby-Grand-Konzertflügel. Als Bedienoberfl äche kommt der bewährte Kontakt-2-Player von Native Instruments zum Einsatz. Über verschiedene Bildschirmseiten lässt sich auf zahlreiche Parameter Einfl uss nehmen: Auf der Main-Seite finden sich dabei die wichtigsten Parameter, während auf der Tone-Seite der Grundklang editiert werden kann. Neben der Klangfarbe ist hier auch die Lautstärke der Resonanz-Samples regelbar, des Weiteren gibt es einen einfachen, aber effektiven Kompressor. Die Konfiguration der Stimmung und Spielbarkeit kann hingegen auf der Anatomy-Seite vorgenommen werden, die Noise-Seite erlaubt hingegen das Festlegen des Anteils der Hammer-, Dämpfer-, Pedal- und Saitengeräusche.  In Galaxy II stehen zwei Halleffekte zur Auswahl: der Ressourcen sparende Eco Reverb und ein gut klingender Faltungshall. Fazit Dank des authentischen, äußerst detaillierten Klangs von Galaxy II und den umfangreichen Klangformungs- und - manipulationsmöglichkeiten konnte das virtuelle Instrument beim Test auf ganzer Linie überzeugen. Dank der umfangreichen Effektsektion gehen die klanglichen Möglichkeiten weit darüber hinaus, was man von einem virtuellen Piano erwartet. So kann man mit dem Plug-in auch Pad-Klänge erzeugen sowie die Samples durch Bit- und Sampleratenreduktion, Chorus-, Flanger- und Phaser-artige Effekte sowie den Impulseffekt Alterizer gehörig durch die Mangel drehen. Nicht unerwähnt bleiben sollen die zahlreichen, musikalisch einsetzbaren globalen Presets. 

Flag ENspaceComputer Music 3/2008


Weve seen our fair share of piano ROMplers here at cm, so it takes something special for us to really sit up and take notice. Galaxy II is just such a beast, offering a substantially superior experience to other virtual pianos, and a degree of control over the sound rarely seen in a ROMpler.

The quality of the recorded samples is superb – the included Steinway D, Bösendorfer and Blüthner are all captured at pristine quality. But perhaps the most impressive aspect is the way that Native Instruments Kontakt Player 2 has been used to give the user control over all of the important aspects of the sound, including dynamics parameters for punching up or softening the patch, and noise controls for adjusting the level of hammer, damper, pedal and string noise.

As well as an array of traditional piano patches, some more esoteric global presets are supplied, including lush pads and warped tones. While the former simply layers the pianos up with some fairly generic samples, the effect works really well, and the wide variety of timbres available right off the bat is a great touch. Overall, Galaxy II is the best piano ROMpler weve ever had the pleasure of playing.

Flag ENspaceSamplecraze 3/2008


Weve seen our fair share of piano ROMplers here at cm, so it takes something special for us to really sit up and take notice. Galaxy II is just such a beast, offering a substantially superior experience to other virtual pianos, and a degree of control over the sound rarely seen in a ROMpler.

The quality of the recorded samples is superb – the included Steinway D, Bösendorfer and Blüthner are all captured at pristine quality. But perhaps the most impressive aspect is the way that Native Instruments Kontakt Player 2 has been used to give the user control over all of the important aspects of the sound, including dynamics parameters for punching up or softening the patch, and noise controls for adjusting the level of hammer, damper, pedal and string noise.

As well as an array of traditional piano patches, some more esoteric global presets are supplied, including lush pads and warped tones. While the former simply layers the pianos up with some fairly generic samples, the effect works really well, and the wide variety of timbres available right off the bat is a great touch. Overall, Galaxy II is the best piano ROMpler weve ever had the pleasure of playing.
Review: Galaxy 2 Piano Vsti  Samplecraze / March 2008 Read the complete review at:
http://www.samplecraze.com/reviews.php?xReviewID=16 .....

Conclusion: For me the acid test of any vsti hinges on a number of factors: easy of use, CPU strain, intuitive, quality and representation, value for money and creativity. 

Galaxy 2s GUI is both simple to use and a breeze to navigate. A well thought out GUI can make all the difference between a successful product and a dead duck. Each menu sensibly houses the relevant sub menu for editing and management. But the GUI also cleverly affords a single screen to show all edits on a global scale. 

The CPU strain is a little on the heavy side but as there is a vast library of samples to sift through it is not surprising that it takes the amount of time that it does to load an instrument. With the use of DFD this CPU hog can be minimized. 

The quality of the samples and the sheer amount of work undertaken to manage them into a sound design concept has to be applauded. There are no tail-offs of dead samples, no wastage of dead air at the start of the samples, no redundant use of the velocity layers and their switching, no badly gain structured samples, and finally, the sheer quality of the recordings is excellent. The recordings alone have been professionally executed and this is a breath of fresh air for me as a sound designer that is anal when it comes to sample management. 

The pianos are well represented, both in terms of accuracy and in sample management. Although a subjective area to negotiate I have found that there are some acid tests to compare original sound sources to their sampled counterparts. In terms of these three pianos there is very little to discern the authenticity of the originals from the sampled offerings. A truly fine ear would probably pick up the ‘colour of the samples as the recordings have been via distinct microphones, but it would be self defeating to try to pick flaws in the actual sample management. 

With most piano libraries, sampled or emulated, it is always the low registers that can cause difficulties as all sorts of harmonic anomalies can take place. I found this not to be as prominent as in other piano vstis. On a couple of instances the low end could have been deemed to be ‘coloured but with the tools available managing any of the registers is easy. The crux of the matter is in the intro to this piece. Certain microphones were used deliberately to add ‘colour to the recordings and this has been achieved…….but subtly. It does not take away from the body of the original but adds a little extra that can be useful when searching for something different. 

In terms of creativity Galaxy 2 affords some wonderful tools, albeit a little limited and unconventional compared to the competition. However, this takes nothing away from the pleasure of sonic manipulation. Maybe not detailed enough for fully fledged sound design projects, but hell, this is a piano vsti, so what am I complaining about? 
The Warp function alone makes this a dream vsti as it would serve quite well as a vst in its own right. The ability to alter an acoustic instrument into an extreme synthetic one can only be a winner. But more importantly it is how well that the Warp function mangles sounds into something both extreme and yet useful. I think a pat on the back for the coders is in order. 

I have my own favoured vstis that I always go back to when searching for a sampled piano, and yes they are all good, but there is something inherently ‘playable about Galaxy 2 that makes me want to use it more than the others. I think it is an overall combination of all the above that keeps veering me towards Galaxy 2. 

In terms of value for money, I cannot recommend a better piano vsti than Galaxy 2. For features, sounds, playability and the Warp function Galaxy 2 is on its own. 

Ignore at your own peril! 

Eddie Bazil (Zukan) 

Flag DEspaceSound & Recording 08/2008


Es gibt viele gute Sample-Libraries. Mit Galaxy II liegt nicht nur eine der hörenswertesten vor, sondern auch eine der flexibelsten und umfangreichsten im Simulationsverhalten.

Das Paket beinhaltet drei Flügel: ein Vienna-Grand (Bösendorfer), ein Baby-Grand (Blüthner Stutzflügel) und einen Steinway D. Alle drei Samplesets überzeugen auf Anhieb durch ihre Qualität. Ausgeliefert wird das Ganze mit einem eigenen Kontaktplayer (Kontakt 2). Die Pianos laufen sowohl als Plug-In als auch im Standalone-Einsatz. Zur vollen Installation werden ca. 30 GB Platz auf der HD benötigt, die Instrumente lassen sich aber auch einzeln installieren. Zusammen decken sie ein breites Spektrum ab. Das
Vienna-Grand für "mächtige" Klaviermusik, der Steinway als Allrounder mit brillantem Durchsetzungsvermögen, und für den Spaß am "etwas Anderen" ist der Blüthner integriert. Dieser kleine Flügel klingt sofort nach Club und Jazz. Nicht zuletzt Count Basie hat so einen häufig gespielt. Für Produktionen, die nicht unbedingt einen klinisch reinen Klang, sondern eher ein fleischig-holziges Instrument benötigen, ist es ein herrliches Teil. Das besondere Schmäckerchen ist aber der Steinway-Flügel, der zusätzlich in einem 5.1-Surround-Set vorliegt. Wer also mit einer entsprechenden Anlage ausgestattet ist, bekommt hier ein wirklich besonderes räumliches Klangerlebnis geboten. 


Der Sound

Jede einzelne Taste in bis zu 12 Velocity-Stufen mit bis zu 50 Sekunden ungeloopter Ausklangphase gesampelt - das gehört zum guten Ton. Die Mikrofonierung ist angenehm direkt gewählt. Sehr realistisch sind vor allem die Release-Samples. Im Moment, wenn der Dämpfer auf die Saite setzt, entsteht quasi ein "Bremsgeräusch", welches sich dynamisch zur Lautstärke des gerade klingenden Tones verhält - beim Original eigentlich auch in Abhängigkeit davon, wie schnell der Dämpfer aufsetzt. Die Release-Samples lassen sich in der Lautstärke anpassen und beleben den Gesamtklang der Galaxy-Pianos ungemein. 

Angenehmerweise leistet sich Galaxy II keine Schwächen im Sample-Mapping. Über die ganze Tastatur herrscht ein ausgewogenes Spielgefühl, und die kraftvollen Bässe machen genauso Spaß wie der glockige Diskant.



Fazit

Das Galaxy II ist ein absolutes Superinstrument, hervorragend im Sound, überragend im Simulationsumfang, und das zu einem mehr als fairen Preis. Das bisschen Kritik am
Pedalverhalten verblasst hoffentlich mit dem bereits angekündigten Update. Galaxy II lässt außer einem "Mehr-Davon" kaum etwas zu wünschen übrig. 
  Read the complete review at:
http://www.samplecraze.com/reviews.php?xReviewID=16 .....

Conclusion: For me the acid test of any vsti hinges on a number of factors: easy of use, CPU strain, intuitive, quality and representation, value for money and creativity. 

Galaxy 2s GUI is both simple to use and a breeze to navigate. A well thought out GUI can make all the difference between a successful product and a dead duck. Each menu sensibly houses the relevant sub menu for editing and management. But the GUI also cleverly affords a single screen to show all edits on a global scale. 

The CPU strain is a little on the heavy side but as there is a vast library of samples to sift through it is not surprising that it takes the amount of time that it does to load an instrument. With the use of DFD this CPU hog can be minimized. 

The quality of the samples and the sheer amount of work undertaken to manage them into a sound design concept has to be applauded. There are no tail-offs of dead samples, no wastage of dead air at the start of the samples, no redundant use of the velocity layers and their switching, no badly gain structured samples, and finally, the sheer quality of the recordings is excellent. The recordings alone have been professionally executed and this is a breath of fresh air for me as a sound designer that is anal when it comes to sample management. 

The pianos are well represented, both in terms of accuracy and in sample management. Although a subjective area to negotiate I have found that there are some acid tests to compare original sound sources to their sampled counterparts. In terms of these three pianos there is very little to discern the authenticity of the originals from the sampled offerings. A truly fine ear would probably pick up the ‘colour of the samples as the recordings have been via distinct microphones, but it would be self defeating to try to pick flaws in the actual sample management. 

With most piano libraries, sampled or emulated, it is always the low registers that can cause difficulties as all sorts of harmonic anomalies can take place. I found this not to be as prominent as in other piano vstis. On a couple of instances the low end could have been deemed to be ‘coloured but with the tools available managing any of the registers is easy. The crux of the matter is in the intro to this piece. Certain microphones were used deliberately to add ‘colour to the recordings and this has been achieved…….but subtly. It does not take away from the body of the original but adds a little extra that can be useful when searching for something different. 

In terms of creativity Galaxy 2 affords some wonderful tools, albeit a little limited and unconventional compared to the competition. However, this takes nothing away from the pleasure of sonic manipulation. Maybe not detailed enough for fully fledged sound design projects, but hell, this is a piano vsti, so what am I complaining about? 
The Warp function alone makes this a dream vsti as it would serve quite well as a vst in its own right. The ability to alter an acoustic instrument into an extreme synthetic one can only be a winner. But more importantly it is how well that the Warp function mangles sounds into something both extreme and yet useful. I think a pat on the back for the coders is in order. 

I have my own favoured vstis that I always go back to when searching for a sampled piano, and yes they are all good, but there is something inherently ‘playable about Galaxy 2 that makes me want to use it more than the others. I think it is an overall combination of all the above that keeps veering me towards Galaxy 2. 

In terms of value for money, I cannot recommend a better piano vsti than Galaxy 2. For features, sounds, playability and the Warp function Galaxy 2 is on its own. 

Ignore at your own peril! 

Eddie Bazil (Zukan)  Testbericht : Galaxy II  Sound & Recording 08/08 Es gibt viele gute Sample-Libraries. Mit Galaxy II liegt nicht nur eine der hörenswertesten vor, sondern auch eine der flexibelsten und umfangreichsten im Simulationsverhalten.

Das Paket beinhaltet drei Flügel: ein Vienna-Grand (Bösendorfer), ein Baby-Grand (Blüthner Stutzflügel) und einen Steinway D. Alle drei Samplesets überzeugen auf Anhieb durch ihre Qualität. Ausgeliefert wird das Ganze mit einem eigenen Kontaktplayer (Kontakt 2). Die Pianos laufen sowohl als Plug-In als auch im Standalone-Einsatz. Zur vollen Installation werden ca. 30 GB Platz auf der HD benötigt, die Instrumente lassen sich aber auch einzeln installieren. Zusammen decken sie ein breites Spektrum ab. Das
Vienna-Grand für "mächtige" Klaviermusik, der Steinway als Allrounder mit brillantem Durchsetzungsvermögen, und für den Spaß am "etwas Anderen" ist der Blüthner integriert. Dieser kleine Flügel klingt sofort nach Club und Jazz. Nicht zuletzt Count Basie hat so einen häufig gespielt. Für Produktionen, die nicht unbedingt einen klinisch reinen Klang, sondern eher ein fleischig-holziges Instrument benötigen, ist es ein herrliches Teil. Das besondere Schmäckerchen ist aber der Steinway-Flügel, der zusätzlich in einem 5.1-Surround-Set vorliegt. Wer also mit einer entsprechenden Anlage ausgestattet ist, bekommt hier ein wirklich besonderes räumliches Klangerlebnis geboten. 


Der Sound

Jede einzelne Taste in bis zu 12 Velocity-Stufen mit bis zu 50 Sekunden ungeloopter Ausklangphase gesampelt - das gehört zum guten Ton. Die Mikrofonierung ist angenehm direkt gewählt. Sehr realistisch sind vor allem die Release-Samples. Im Moment, wenn der Dämpfer auf die Saite setzt, entsteht quasi ein "Bremsgeräusch", welches sich dynamisch zur Lautstärke des gerade klingenden Tones verhält - beim Original eigentlich auch in Abhängigkeit davon, wie schnell der Dämpfer aufsetzt. Die Release-Samples lassen sich in der Lautstärke anpassen und beleben den Gesamtklang der Galaxy-Pianos ungemein. 

Angenehmerweise leistet sich Galaxy II keine Schwächen im Sample-Mapping. Über die ganze Tastatur herrscht ein ausgewogenes Spielgefühl, und die kraftvollen Bässe machen genauso Spaß wie der glockige Diskant.



Fazit

Das Galaxy II ist ein absolutes Superinstrument, hervorragend im Sound, überragend im Simulationsumfang, und das zu einem mehr als fairen Preis. Das bisschen Kritik am
Pedalverhalten verblasst hoffentlich mit dem bereits angekündigten Update. Galaxy II lässt außer einem "Mehr-Davon" kaum etwas zu wünschen übrig. 
 
top

product ratings Ratings

To The Top

The following reviews have been placed by customers who also bought this product from us. All reviews are provided through eKomi, Europes largest independent customer review company.

 
Language: englisch
5.0 of 5

My Every day Piano Sound Since many years. K4 Update even Better. GUI Looks a Little Bit 80's, But controls are very useful. Love it.

17.11.2016
Language: englisch
5.0 of 5

After comparing with others Piano library.The Galaxy II pianos sound are rich and the operating is easy.Also the price is a deal.

01.04.2016
Language: englisch
5.0 of 5

Very excellent piano sounds: every piano sound has its proper personal charachter. I mostly like Vienna piano and Galaxy piano. The service is fast, professional and easy.

27.03.2016
arrow right
related products onrelated products offrelated products offrelated products off
top

requirements Requirements

To The Top

Kontakt poweredThe latest NI Kontakt Player is included in this product!
The minimum Kontakt Player version to use this library is specified in the product description.

Download latest free Kontakt Player Windows (~ 450MB)
Download latest free Kontakt Player Mac INTEL (~ 600MB)

You want more?
This library qualifies for the reduced Crossgrades of full KONTAKT at Native Instruments (€ 249 instead of 399)
________________________________________________________

Windows
Windows 7, 8 or 10 (latest Service Pack, 32/64-bit)
Intel Core 2 Duo or AMD AthlonTM 64 X2, 4 GB RAM (6 GB recommended)

Mac
Mac OS X 10.10, 10.11 oder 10.12 (latest update)
Intel Core 2 Duo, 4 GB RAM (6 GB recommended)

for all

  • 1GB free disc space for player installation
  • additional hard disc space according to the library size
  • internet connection for product activation required (on any computer)


SUPPORTED INTERFACES

  • Stand-Alone
  • VST
  • Audio Units
  • ASIO
  • CoreAudio
  • WASAPI
  • AAX Native (Pro Tools 10 or later)

Kontakt Player legacy downloads - please check compatibility with your libraries!

Kontakt Player 5 5.3.1 Win (WIN 7 or higher)
Kontakt Player 5 5.3.1 Mac (OS X 10.7 or higher)

Kontakt Player 5 5.1.0 Win (WIN XP or higher)
Kontakt Player 5 5.1.0 Mac (OS X 10.7 or higher)

Kontakt Player 5 5.0.3 Win (WIN XP or higher)
Kontakt Player 5 5.0.3 Mac (OS X 10.6)

Kontakt Player 4 4.2.2 Win (WIN XP or higher)
Kontakt Player 4 4.2.2 Mac  (OS X 10.5 / 10.6)

System FAQs
System FAQs - Galaxy II Pianos

Q: Can I use the included Kontakt Player for playing other libraries in Kontakt format (.nki plus .wav files)?
A: No, they only work in a 15 minutes demo mode
__________________________________________________

Q: When trying to "Add Library" my Kontakt shows a message "No Library found"
A: Then this is not a protected Kontakt library, but an open Kontakt format. You can find additional hints for Kontakt Libraries in that Sounds & Gear Video

online activationProduct activation:
An internet connection on any computer is required to authorize / activate the product (Challenge/Response).

Contact

msg

msg

msg

Best Service account login
Please sign in with your login credentials
 
 
 
space
   
ajax-loader
 
space